Tag Archives: Jack Phillips

Welcome to June

Why Titanic’s First Call For Help Wasn’t An SOS Signal (National Geographic, 28 May 20)

But by 1912 when Titanic sailed, there was another, competing distress signal on the scene: “SOS.” There’s a common misnomer that the distress call is short for “Save Our Ship” or “Save Our Souls,” but the letters didn’t stand for anything—it was an adaptation of an existing German radio call. The signal consisted of three dots, three dashes, and another three dots—simple to tap out in Morse code during an emergency and easy to understand, even in poor conditions. An international group including the United Kingdom had ratified SOS as the official international distress signal four years earlier in 1908, but British and Marconi telegraph operators took their time adopting the new signal. (The United States, which resisted early international radio regulation, did not initially sign on to the SOS agreement.)

Cork Historian Teams Up With US Company To Bring Titanic Trail Online (EchoLive.ie, 27 May 20)

Acclaimed historian and lifelong Titanic researcher, Dr Michael Martin is collaborating with American travel experiences company Walks to provide an online tour of Cobh, the Titanic’s last port of call. The Titanic Trail, established in 1998 by Dr Martin is a daily guided walking tour that explores the heritage of Cobh, providing an insight into the maritime, military and social heritage of the town and harbour.  The renowned tour is now going online for a limited time as part of Walks ‘Spotlight Series’ With many walking tours affected as a result of Covid-19, the Spotlight Series brings fascinating tours online, which people can enjoy from the comfort of their own home. 

Bouquet of beautiful red roses
Davidjose365, May 2015
Wikimedia Commons

June is the sixth month on both the Gregorian and Julian calendars. June has the summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere and the winter solstice in the Southern Hemisphere. Traditionally this is on June 21 but that can vary each year.  Ancient Romans thought the period from Mid-March to Mid-June was a bad time to get married. June’s birthstones are the pearl, alexandrite and moonstone. The rose and honeysuckle are June flowers.

Sunday Titanic News

 

Photo:Daemonic Kangaroo(Wikipedia)

Haunting video of Titanic 100 years on exposes the cabins and hallways where 1,500 died (Daily Star, 27 April 2018)
The clip shows the cabins and hallways where passengers slept, ate and partied on their journey from Southampton to New York. It also reveals cooking utensils, bottles and cutlery, in a room where it is likely chef’s prepared meals for their wealthy passengers. Another angle displays the sheer size of the vessel – which remains a shipwreck near the Canadian island of Newfoundland.

Autistic boy overcomes obstacles to build largest Lego replica of the Titanic (WIVB.com,26 April 2018)
The world’s largest Lego Titanic replica is 24 feet long and five feet tall — and it was built by a very special boy. Fifteen-year-old Brynjar Karl Birgisson is on the autism spectrum, and he developed a passion for learning about the Titanic at a young age. When he turned 10, Brynjar decided to combine his passion for the Titanic with his other love: Legos. The painstaking task took 700 hours over 11 months and 56,000 Lego bricks to complete, but when he was finished, Brynjar had built the world’s largest Titanic replica made out of Legos.

Menu for first ever meal onboard the Titanic makes auction record (Antiques Trade Gazette,25 April 2018)
Henry Aldridge & Son offered the lots at its Titanic & Liner Auction on April 21, which made an overall auction total of around £330,000.
The menu for the first meal served on the ill-fated ship had been owned by Titanic second officer Charles Lightoller, the most senior member of the crew to survive the Titanic disaster. It sold for a hammer price of £80,000, a record for a menu from the ship. The menu was previously auctioned in 2003 when it sold for £28,000 at Sotheby’s, and a similar menu, with a strip missing at the bottom and owned by fifth officer Harold Lowe, sold at £51,000 at Aldridge’s in 2004.

His blood ran cold’: The act that sealed the Titanic’s fate (New Zealand Herald, 23 April 2018)
The nearest boat to the great cruise liner, the Californian, was less than 20 kilometres away, within eyeshot — and a crew member informed Captain Stanley Lord the Titanic was sending up distress rockets. Yet, surrounded by icebergs, he decided not to act. He didn’t wake his wireless operator, he didn’t try to contact the ship and he didn’t head towards it. “The hazard to himself and his command was too great to risk responding,” Titanic researcher Daniel Allen Butler told news.com.au. “The Californian did nothing.”

The rarely told story of Jack Phillips, the Titanic hero from Surrey (Get Surrey, 21 April 2018)
The story of Jack Phillips, the Titanic hero from Surrey, is a well-known one. The 25-year-old Godalming-born telegraphist was aboard the Titanic when it hit an iceberg on April 14, 1912. He stayed at his post until the ship sank, frantically contacting nearby ships and saving hundreds of lives. More than 1,500 people drowned but the Carpathia, a ship alerted to the Titanic’s plight by the signals, picked up 705 survivors. Jack sadly died during the disaster but his co-worker Harold Bride survived to tell the story. Following the 106th anniversary of the catastrophic sinking, Titanic enthusiast from Guildford, Mia Fernandez, 30, claims there is a part of the story that is rarely remembered.

The Titanic’s Irish Legacy (Irish America, 20 April 2018)
It was White Star Line who paid for the headstones that went up during the autumn of 1912. The Titanic bodies, those not claimed by relatives, were divided between three different graveyards, the biggest share going to the Fairview Lawn Cemetery. Here, 121 bodies are buried with 42 remaining unidentified. A gentle sloping of the ground made it necessary to lay the headstones out in three curved lines, reminiscent of the curve of a ship’s bow. One of the Titanic occupants is Jack Dawson whose grave, thanks to Leonardo di Caprio’s fictional namesake in the 1997 film Titanic, perhaps rivals Jim Morrison’s grave in Père Lachaise with hundreds of visitors leaving flowers and trinkets around it. The second graveyard, the Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery’s Titanic plot contains 19 victims, including Mrs Margaret Rice from Athlone, Ireland, who was travelling with her five young sons, none of whom were ever found. Four victims were never identified.

Why you’ve never heard of the six Chinese men who survived the Titanic (Washington Post, 19 April 2018)
That man would be one of six Chinese passengers who survived the Titanic, a little-known fact about the historic disaster that has largely remained untold or distorted, owing to a racially hostile environment toward Chinese people in the West at the turn of the 20th century. Now, the lives of these men — who they were, how they survived that fateful night and why they were barred from entering the United States — are being examined in a new documentary, “The Six,” by Arthur Jones and Steven Schwankert.

Michigan Organizers To Unveil Titanic Memorial In May (WKAR.org, 14 April 2018)
The Great Lakes Titanic Connection will reveal the Michigan Titanic Memorial in Marine City on May 12, the Times Herald reported . The memorial will list the 69 names of the passengers headed to Michigan who were among the 1,500 who died while sailing from Southampton, England, for the United States in 1912.The group raised $6,500 to pay for the memorial. The idea began when Margaret Micoff started collecting Titanic memorabilia for her boutique clothing store. She studied the Titanic’s history and stumbled across a community of people who were also fascinated with the story. “When you have that many people, and nobody has done a memorial like other states have done, I thought we should,” Micoff said.

106 years after sinking, Nova Scotians commemorate Titanic victims (CTV News,15 April 2018)
Deanna Ryan-Meister, president of the Titanic Society of Atlantic Canada, says she’s not surprised the disaster is still holding peoples’ attention after more than a century. She says it’s important to continue to honour those who started their voyage with hope and ended it with tragedy.


Godalming Museum To Get Jack Phillips Postcards

Jack George Phillips, Titanic Wireless Operator Photo: Public Domain
Jack George Phillips, Titanic Wireless Operator
Photo: Public Domain

A collection of Titanic wireless operator Jack Phillips postcards are being bequeathed to Godalming Museum. Mandy Le Boutillier, a Titanic enthusiast, has collected many of his postcards and believes their rightful home is Godalming. Phillip’s sister Elsie had a large collection of his postcards that was put up for auction in 1997. Godalming Museum was outbid by an American memorabilia collector who split up the collection and sold many postcards individually at auction.

“I am not a wealthy benefactor, I am just a normal person with a job,” she said. “But I am always on the lookout for these postcards and getting more all the time. Of course the museum is free to use them for special exhibitions, but when I die they will always end up there. I’m just not planning on that happening straight away.”

Source: Titanic Hero’s Postcards Promised To Godalming Museum(4 May 2014,Get Surrey)


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Sunday Titanic News: Ballard is Honored, Titanic Tech To Help Missing Plane Search, And Titanic Wireless Operator Postcard Goes Up For Auction

Photo:Wikipedia
Photo:Wikipedia

1. Robert Ballard has been elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences according to University of Rhode Island(URI). Ballard is a oceanography professor at URI and founder of Ocean Exploration Trust. He is among 204 chosen in 2014 for American Academy. Induction ceremony will take place in October at the Cambridge, Mass., headquarters.
Source: Famed Ocean Explorer Ballard, Who Discovered Titanic Wreck, Elected Member Of American Academy(23 April 2014,Star Tribune)

Operators aboard ADF Ocean Shield move U.S. Navy’s Bluefin-21 into position for deployment, April 14, 2014, searching for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Photo:Public Domain (U.S. Navy ID 140414-N-OV358-036)
Operators aboard ADF Ocean Shield move U.S. Navy’s Bluefin-21 into position for deployment, April 14, 2014, searching for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.
Photo:Public Domain (U.S. Navy ID 140414-N-OV358-036)

2. Sky News reports that a sonar tracking system similar to what was used to locate Titanic may be used in the hunt for the missing Malaysian flight MH370. Bluefin 21, an autonomous underwater vehicle, has done 80% of the work so far but has a limitation of 4500 meters. So they plan to deploy a side-scan sonar device that will go deeper. The U.S. Navy Orion-towed search systems is available and offers real-time date unlike Bluefin 21. Also the REMUS 6000 autonomous underwater vehicle is being considered for use as well.
Source: Titanic Boost In Search For MH370(23 April 2014, Sky News)

Jack George Phillips, Titanic Wireless Operator Photo: Public Domain
Jack George Phillips, Titanic Wireless Operator
Photo: Public Domain

3. A postcard sent by Titanic wireless operator Jack Phillips will be auctioned off in the United States disappointing historians who want it brought back to England. The postcard, bearing the image of Titanic, was sent on 6 April 1914 to his sister Elsie reads: “Thanks very much for your letter. Having glorious weather, went to Cowes yesterday. Will write later before we sail.” Alison Pattison of the Godalming Museum says:”The story of Jack Phillips is one which gains a lot of interest locally and of course if money was no object we would be absolutely delighted to have it here in Godalming. However, we simply don’t have the budget for things like this, so purchases have to be made using grants, or more usually we receive items donated from collectors.”
Source: Titanic Hero’s Postcard ‘Should Be Returned To Godalming(25 April 2014,Get Surrey)


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Friday Titanic News

 

1. This is Surrey Today has an article detailing locals who survived or died on Titanic. One Jack George Phillipsof the more noted was Jack Phillips, who was chief wireless officer aboard Titanic. Both he and Harold Bride were the ones who sent the now famous SOS signal to all ships in the area.

Source:  TITANIC: Remembering Those Who Sailed On The Fateful Voyage(12 April 2013, This is Surreytoday)

2. Belfast will remember those who perished aboard Titanic (which included 28 from Belfast) with a midday ceremony. The Lord Mayor and the president of the Belfast Titanic Society will lay wreaths at Titanic Memorial on City Hall grounds. Six men whose names were not known at the time the memorial was built will be honored as well.

Source: Belfast To Mark Titanic 101 Anniversary(11 April 2013, 4ni.co.uk)

3. A number Titanic Artifacts are at Titanic Experience in Cobh, Ireland. Items such as a blue leather suitcase bought at Harrod’s and the personal property of Lilly Odell are permanent. The exhibition includes photographs and items on loan to the collection.

Source: Historic Titanic Artifacts Returned To Cobh For Anniversary(11 April 2013, thejournal.ie )*

4. The Southampton SeaCity museum, which opened in 2012, is doing well reports Daily Echo. Critics had feared once Titanic centenary had faded that visitors would melt away. The project, called a white elephant by many locally, cost £15m. 143,000 visitors have passed through its doors since exceeding its target by 20,000. To keep people coming back, the museum plans to host other major national exhibitions.

Source: Southampton’s SeaCity Museum Celebrates Year Of Success After Titanic Centenary(11 April 2013, Daily Echo)

*Links for Republic of Ireland newspaper are not provided due to policy of requiring fees for links.

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