Titanic Sequel News:Titanic 2 Straight to DVD

Jokes about a Titanic sequel have sadly proven true. According to Ecorazzi, a sequel has finally appeared. Well sort of. It is not quite a sequel but about a ship called Titanic 2 that according to the marketing is about:

On the 100th anniversary of the original voyage, a modern luxury liner christened “Titanic 2,” follows the path of its namesake. But when a tsunami hurls an iceberg into the new ship’s path, the passengers and crew must fight to avoid a similar fate.

Tsunami? Iceberg? Personally I was looking for it to be Marvin the Martian testing out a new death ray! 🙂

You can read more details at The Asylum.

Titanic 2: Destined to be a low seller at Amazon.

British Warship Rescues Family After Yacht Hits Iceberg

Fox News is reporting that a yacht in the South Atlantic hit a growler and required assistance. From the news report:

Carl Lomas and Tracey Worth, also known as Lord and Lady Hollinsclough, were sailing to Cape Town with their daughters, Caitland and Morgause Lomas, believed to be in their teens. They ran into trouble in the South Atlantic after hitting a low-lying iceberg similar to the one that sank the Titanic. Falmouth Coastguard helped authorities in the Falkland Islands locate the vessel – named Yacht Hollinsclough – which had taken on water and suffered engine failure. “What they’ve hit is a ‘growler’, where hardly anything is out of the water and the majority is submerged,” a coastguard spokesman explained. “It is very similar to what the Titanic hit. You can track them by radar or visual lookout, but you can’t see them all.”

Good to learn all have been rescued. One slight quibble is that  Titanic did not hit a growler but likely one that had turned turtle (meaning larger underwater than above).

Fox News, British Warship Rescues Family After Yacht Hits Iceberg, 9 May 2010

Sort of Titanic Cliche of Day: Newsweek Editor Compared To Captain Smith

Poor Captain Smith. At one time a well respected sea captain and commodore of the White Star Line. Now just an afterthought for commentators searching for ways to include Titanic into their writing. Take the case of Newsweek.  It is for sale and the editor, Jon Meacham, is out making the rounds that it was not his fault.

Jim Treacher over at Daily Caller notes some of Meacham’s odd comments. Like that for 77 years Newsweek mattered to the country. Quite a statement considering that the country seems to have decided not to buy or subscribe to the magazine these days. Treacher for his part delivers in pointing out that probably no one ever heard of Jon Meacham till now.

The news that the Washington Post Company is selling off Newsweek is the most shocking development in the media world since the cancellation of Buggy Whip Monthly. The magazine’s editor, Jon Meacham, has been making the media rounds, explaining why it’s not his fault. If you don’t recognize his name, don’t worry. Nobody remembers who the captain of the Titanic was either.

Ouch! I must admit I never knew who Jon Meacham was until now. Then again I did know Titanic’s captain. Not quite a full cliche but in the ballpark. At least Treacher did not compare Meacham’s handling of Newsweek to that of Captain Smith.

  • Titanic Exhibition Company Gets Bottom Rating

    graph downSmarTrend back in April reported on five companies in the Leisure industry that were on the bottom regarding Return on Equity (ROE). Investors prefer companies where the ROE is growing rather than stagnant. In SmarTrend’s analysis, Premier Exhibitions lost -23.4%  topping the list of the worst returns on ROE. Not a happy day if you have invested in Premier Exhibitions (NASDAQ:PRXI).

     

    Titanic Cliche of the Day

    Rob Neyer at ESPN blogs about Joe Posnanski’s comments on the Royals sending down Alex Gordon to Triple A. Posnanski refers to Titanic:

    This isn’t just rearranging furniture on the Titanic. It’s rearranging furniture on the Titanic to make room for the wagon wheel coffee table.

    ESPN, Have Royals Given Up On Alex Gordon?, 3 May 2010

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    Titanic Voted Best Movie Song

    [amazonify]B000VS6R26[/amazonify] Contactmusic.com is reporting My Heart Will Go On has been voted the best film song of all time. The top ten are as follows:

    1. Celine Dion – My Heart Will Go On, Titanic

    2. Take That – Rule The World, Stardust

    3. Aerosmith – I Don’t Wanna Miss A Thing, Armageddon

    4. Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes – Time Of My Life, Dirty Dancing

    5. Sir Elton John – Can You Feel The Love Tonight, The Lion King

    6. Sir Elton John – Circle Of Life, The Lion King

    7. Whitney Houston – I Will Always Love You, The Bodyguard

    8. John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John – Summer Nights, Grease

    9. Leona Lewis – I See You, Avatar

    10. Faith Hill – There You’ll Be, Pearl Harbor.

    Just proves some songs are enjoyed long after the movie it was in has departed the theatre.  I am not surprised to see Circle of Life on the list but surprised to see Summer Nights from Grease. Olivia still has appeal after many years since that movie came out. Too bad a song from West Side Story did not make it. Some do not like Celine Dion’s song but, despite the critics, it still tops the list year after year.

    Buy the [amazonify]B0000029YC::text::::Titanic soundtrack[/amazonify] today!

    Titanic Odds and Ends

    New York Hotel With Titanic Connection

    The Jane Hotel in New York not only costs $79 a night, has bellboys dressed in old fashioned “monkey suits,” but also has a Titanic connection. According to Reb Stevenson of the Toronto Star this 146 room hotel in Manhattan’s West Village is worth a stay if for nothing else the ecentric theme. Originally a lodging for sailors when it opened in 1908, it became famous in 1912 when Titanic survivors stayed there. The Jane was not much over the years and more of a flophouse according to Stevenson. Then it was bought in 2008 by Sean MacPherson, who owns three other Manhattan hotels. At first the plan was to scrap the old place and put up a traditional hotel. Then MacPherson got the idea to rennovate it into a more upscale but less pricey place for people of modest means to stay.

    The standard cabins aren’t much larger than a sleeping bag on the sidewalk, but they’ve got style in spades. Throughout The Jane, there’s a vague, nautical feel, as though it shares some of Titanic’s DNA. Within my five-by-seven-foot room, I’ve got a single bed, flat-screen TV, iPod dock, fan, towel, slippers, storage cubbyholes, hooks and even a window. Yes, it’s rather snug, but since I’m not a scarecrow I can cope. There is no Edwardian chamber pot in the cabin. And thank God for that. Instead, guests must brave shared coed washrooms down the hall.

    More spacey abodes are available (which cost more) and there is a restaurant with a French/Moroccan theme that has nothing more expensive than $14 on the menu. And the male staff all sport the retro bellboy costumes of long ago. There is a large ballroom with that overstuffed Victorian feel to it (closed at the moment due to permit issues) and a bar that is lush and mysterious. Not bad for $79 a night and comes with a Titanic angle. Something tells me that attractive gal who travels the world for the Travel Channel will not be stopping here soon. But the cost-cutting Rick Steves might find the place worth a try. 🙂

    Titanic Grim: 1 in 89 Survivors Committed Suicide

    Kathleen Minnix recently posted at Book of Odds a grim statistic on Titanic survivors –1 in 89 ended up taking their lives. Some of the more notable suicides are Dr. Washington Dodge, Jack Thayer, and Titanic lookout Frederick Fleet. Dodge shot himself over a lawsuit in 1919, Thayer slashed his wrists and throat in 1945 over a son’s death in World War 11. Frederick Fleet died in 1965 by hanging himself on a clothes line. His wife had died in December and his brother-in-law had evicted from the house.

    The earliest suicide was in 1912.  Annie Robinson, who had been a stewardess on Titanic, was aboard the Devonian on 10 October. The ship encountered heavy fog in Boston and she became agitated. Shortly after the fog horn sounded, she threw herself into the water and drowned. The last survivor suicide was on 11 Jul 1989 by Phyllis May Quick. She shot herself in the head at her home in Detroit.

    A grim statistic indeed.

    Tacky Titanic: Flamed Iceberg Desert

    Britain’s finest chef is under fire for a Titanic meal that includes a desert called flambéed iceberg (flamed iceberg). According to the Daily Echo, Heston Blumenthal will be serving up the ““greatest feast never eaten: the last meal on the Titanic.” That flaming iceberg bit has caused an uproar from Titanic enthusiasts and relatives of survivors and victims.

    Titanic historian Brian Ticehurst described the flamed iceberg dessert as “tacky”, while Terry Yarwood, from the Tug Tender Calshot Trust, said it was “sick”. “I know Heston’s considered a great chef, but this seems to be in the worst taste possible. It’s quite appalling,” Mr Yarwood said.

    Indeed. One giant thumbs down for Heston Blumenthal. In a word, stupid.

    Titanic 2010

    Titanic still draws people to her long after she sank in 1912. There are the usual memorials in Belfast, Southampton, Halifax and other places. Each year the U.S. Coast Guard flies over the area Titanic sank to drop a wreath. Other less noticed things occur as well. Titanic themed meals are in vogue. People dress up in period outfits, attend a dinner that approximates meals served aboard ship, and learn some Titanic lore from enthusiasts. Titanic documentaries are often shown around this time along with showings of A Night To Remember (1958), a fondly remembered movie based on Walter Lord’s book. The more recent Titanic is not history but does recreate the ship wonderfully along with rich period look and feel.?

    Titanic is not unlike a Greek tragedy. Such tragedies always depict the outcome as avoidable. Not so far off in Titanic’s case. Her demise was avoidable and arguably predictable. Walter Lord summarizes it as complacency on all levels: government, the ship owners, and those commanded them. No one seemed overly concerned with the lack of lifeboats. Ship owners, for reasons of economy and aesthetics, did not want too many. They knew their presence comforted passengers. The Board of Trade considered passengers cargo and cargo equals space. So lifeboats were tagged to the amount of space one took, not on the total number of passengers and crew aboard ship. Fine in small vessels but inadequate when the numbers exceeded the total capacity of lifeboats available.

    Major shipwrecks were rare but not uncommon. Most ship owners believed the risk was minimal. They also believed passengers carried the risk as well. It was always a possibility, however remote, that something would go wrong resulting in injury or death. Strict liability laws made it difficult (but not impossible) to obtain judgments against them. Many became complacent about the danger of a major catastrophe. They believed in all the wondrous new technologies that made ships stronger and safer. A ship might be wounded, scraped, and battered but would remain afloat. Titanic was designed with that in mind.

    Even with lifeboats, it required a trained crew to work them. And on Titanic, that was a problem. Too few were experienced in this task. Smith never had a boat drill. Boat assignments were posted after leaving Queenstown. Manning was inconsistent. Lifeboat 6 was assigned two while Lifeboat 3 had 15. Worse neither he or the senior officers had any idea how many people each lifeboat would carry. They did not know they had been throughly tested by Harland & Wolff to carry 65 persons without any sign of strain. Harland & Wolff never mentioned it, according to Walter Lord, because they assumed Smith and his officers knew this “as a matter of general knowledge.”

    Captain Smith was experienced officer. He was widely respected amongst his peers and passengers who sailed on his ships. Yet like many others he was complacent. Until he commanded Olympic, he never had any major problems at sea. However the incident in New York with a tug and the Olympic’s collision with the Royal Navy cruiser Hawke were warnings about how differently these new large ships operated. And suction from the propellers caused the liner New York to break moorings in Southampton. Independently these events proved nothing but together form a pattern. All of them occurred while he was in command.

    So his lack of action on lifeboat organization is not the work of a lazy or incompetent ship master. It is of someone who believed they would never be needed except in very rare circumstances. Unlike the depiction in A Night To Remember, Smith was not decisive and barking out orders when the crisis hit. Instead he had to be asked by his officers about lowering lifeboats and other orders like firing distress rockets. Which is why things were confusing on that night. Passengers did not know where to go and had to wait for instructions on deck. Lightoller and Murdoch operated inconsistent policies in their respective lifeboat operations. Lightoller was strict about women and children first while Murdoch allowed men on lifeboats. Smith was likely in shock about Titanic sinking and the terrible loss of life about to happen.

    It was not long after Titanic’s sinking that every passenger liner put lifeboats for all and pronounced it in advertisements. No longer was it an issue of money but one of safety. The shocking numbers of those saved to those lost were the new mathematics. And ship owners complied and later maritime laws would make it mandatory along with boat drills for crew. Today most cruise passengers have to practice putting on life jackets and assemble at designated points not long after sailing. While no one crashes into icebergs these days, very rough seas can tumble ships as recent stories indicate. Complacency was certainly major element to the Titanic disaster, which is why one must never become too comfortable for the unexpected happens more often than we like to admit.

    Commentary on Titanic news and other related items.

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